If I Cannot get SSDI, Can I get SSI?

If you have not worked, have worked but not paid taxes or have worked in the past but waited too many years to file for disability you might not qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance. Maybe you are wondering, “If I cannot get Social Security Disability Insurance, can I get Supplemental Security Income?”

How does the SSA award benefits?

Most claimants do not realize that the disability determination process is the same for SSI and SSDI. The only difference is the nonmedical criteria for each program. For instance, if you apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) but you are denied, the SSA will examine whether or not your income and resources are low enough for SSI benefits.

If you meet the resource and income limitations and other requirements of the SSI program the SSA will pull your medical records and determine whether or not you can receive Supplemental Security Income benefits.

If you do not meet the income and resource limitations for the SSI program the SSA does not pull your medical records and will not evaluate your disability status.

Does everyone who apply win disability?

Unfortunately, many claimants assume that the disability programs offered by the Social Security Administration are similar to the retirement programs: you decide you cannot work, you contact the SSA and they mail you a check.

It is not this simple. In fact, there are over 2 million claimants who apply for SSI or SSDI each year and over 70% are denied. Some of these claimants appeal their claims and go on to win benefits; other are never approved for SSDI or SSI benefits.

What reasons can the SSA deny my SSDI benefits?

To win SSDI benefits you will have to prove that you have a very severe health condition which does not allow you to perform substantial gainful activity. Your condition must also be expected to last for at least 12 continuous months. Additionally, you must have accumulated work credits by working and paying employment taxes for a specific number of years. Even more confusing is that a specific number of your accumulated work credits must have been earned in the 10 years before your date of disability.

So why are claimants denied SSDI benefits? You can be denied for any of the reasons listed above: your condition is not severe, your condition is not expected to last 12 continuous months, you do not have enough work credits, you have work credits but they were not earned close enough your date of disability.

So, no, not all claimants who apply for disability will win benefits.

What reasons can the SSA deny my SSI benefits?

As mentioned above, if you do not qualify for SSDI, it may be possible to win SSI benefits, assuming you meet the criteria for the SSI program. Many claimants may be severely disabled and not have enough work credits for SSDI but have too much income or resources for SSI.

This occurs frequently for spouses who have been homemakers but who now find themselves seriously disabled but their spouses work and make too much money for them to qualify for Supplemental Security Income.

If you have not worked, have worked but not paid taxes or have worked in the past but waited too many years to file for disability you might not qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance. Maybe you are wondering, “If I cannot get Social Security Disability Insurance, can I get Supplemental Security Income?”

 

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beth

Beth L. is a content writer for Disability Benefits Home. Good content and information is one of many methods we utilize to bring you the answers you need.

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